My first deployment was to Iraq in 2006. It made several things clear. Before Iraq, my faith was comfortable. It had been tried, tested, and proven, but in a very clean and simple way. My faith was comfortable in seminary, at home, at work, and in the church. But that all changed in Iraq. I saw what it was like to constantly be under attack and understood what it was like to be under the threat of death. Iraq gave me something that most Americans do not experience. Iraq also gave me something that most Christians in the western world do not experience. Iraq changed me, but it also changed my faith for the better.

One of the major discoveries from my time in Iraq was truly learning the power and importance of prayer. While seminary gave me the tools and the knowledge regarding a solid prayer life, Iraq was the furnace that forged my prayer life into a solid existence.

Here are four lessons on prayer that helped me down range.

Share your heart. Be transparent with God. Big or small, lift your prayers to the Lord. The night before flying into the combat zone, I spent two and a half hours in prayer. This was the longest span of time I had ever spoken to God in one setting. I had a lot of ground to cover if this was potentially my last night on earth. Cry out no matter what the concern may be. Philippians 4:6 reminds each of us “. . . in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.”

Pray now, not later. Be immediate with prayer. Time is precious, especially in a war zone. If someone shared a prayer request, my new practice was to stop and immediately pray with the person. The location may be on the sidewalk, in the parking lot, at the chow hall, or in the office. There was no reason to wait and the soldier had a need that deserved to be addressed. Hebrews 4:16 shares, “Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

Keep it simple. There is no need to be fancy. Wordsmiths have their place, but not on the battlefield. I felt God calling me to pray for aircraft, well the crews and passengers on board. I crafted a simple three point prayer to say every time I heard a helicopter or aircraft departing the base. Jesus reminds us not to have babbling prayers in Matthew 6:7. Prayers are not heard for the sake of many words.

Have a consistent pattern. My routine was very disjointed in Iraq. The start and end of every day lacked consistency. Unit operations had to happen 24 hours a day and the war didn’t stop. The best time to pray was right before I went to sleep. I could make time to pray once my boots came off. It took a while to find that right recipe, but once I found it the routine stuck. Find a time or habit that can help you make space for prayer. Colossians 4:2 encourages us to, “Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.”

There are many lessons a veteran will find down range. Theses lessons can benefit our Christian walk. The trials of yesterday make us stronger for tomorrow. May God grant us the calling of Romans 12:12, to “Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, and faithful in prayer.”

A Prayer for 9-11


world-trade-center-9-11-crossHeavenly Father and Precious Lord, we seek you and your healing mercy.

As fifteen years pass, we remember the pain and suffering of a horrible day. We remember the loss of life, the destruction, and the chaos of that fateful morning. Sorrow remains. Grief returns. Heartache and despair weigh us down.

Almighty God comfort and calm our souls. Turn our hearts into an altar where healing can take place. Transform our spirits into a place of peace. Allow restoration and redemption in our lives. We are a people who need you and your presence.

Give us strength to perform your will. Allow us to move forward as a renewed people. Keep us bold, strong, and true. Just like clay on the potter’s wheel, shape us and mold us into a new creation, one that continues to show your glory.

As conflicts remain and others begin, protect our warriors in harm’s way. Guide their way and direct their steps. Comfort the families who are divided by war and give them the strength necessary for every day apart. Minister to their needs and surround them with your love.

Lord, hear our prayer. We are a nation and a people who need you. Allow us to feel your healing mercy through our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Bible teen

The Barna Group conducted a nationwide survey of over 1,000 participants between the ages of 13 and 17. The findings and factors may surprise you. While a majority of teenagers still have reverence for the Bible, their views have been heavily influenced by today’s secular society. Much of what teenagers believe today comes from public schools, the media, and the entertainment industry instead of their own family or the church.

Seven out of ten teens personally own a Bible, but only 3 percent report reading the Bible on a daily basis. One in ten teens read the Bible once a month and an additional 10 percent report reading the Bible three or four times a year. The survey also showed that 37 percent of teens say that they never read the Bible.

If those figures scare you, know that you are not alone. While we are able to put Bibles in the hands of teenagers, much more needs to be done on demonstrating the power and promise of God’s Holy Word.

Christian education in America has remained tepid for the last fifty years. Churches and faith-based organizations must come back to the task of making disciples in a Biblical manner. Ignoring the Great Commission will ultimately send the church into collapse.

When you look at Matthew 28:18-20, there are two parts to the Great Commission. The first is found in verse 19 to “go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” The second part is often overlooked, but it’s vital to form new Christians. Verse 20 shares the necessity of “teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.” The second part of discipleship is teaching people how to live like Jesus.

If someone gave you a gift, but never showed you how to use it, you would likely lay it on the shelf. So it is with the Bible and faith. It is inherent for mature Christians to teach the next generation.

Perhaps we should also evaluate how we teach. If Sunday school teachers are producing teens with perfect attendance pins and little knowledge of God’s Word, then we have completely missed the point of Bible classes. Somewhere and somehow there is a failure that must be fixed.

I believe the Bible is the cornerstone of Christian discipleship. Through Scripture we find faith in Jesus Christ and receive instruction on how to live like Jesus. It is God’s truth. It shows us what to believe. It delivers genuine guidance from God. It is the standard that guides our life.

As the cornerstone for discipleship, let us commit ourselves to teaching the next generation of Christians what the Bible is and how to use it in life. The teens of today deserve teachers and mentors who will help them worship, witness, and work for the glory of God.

Purple Heart Day

purple heart

The Purple Heart Medal is the oldest award given in the US military.  It was established by General George Washington on August 7, 1782. Washington originally called it the Badge of Military Merit and personally awarded three medals during the Revolutionary War.

Today, we recognize Purple Heart recipients as heroes. The medal is awarded for being wounded or killed in any action against an enemy of the United States.

The Purple Heart differs from most other decorations in that a person is not “recommended” for the decoration; rather he or she is entitled to it because of wounds received in battle.

It is truly humbling to consider that someone is willing to die for me. These men and women are living examples of that sacrificial spirit.

As we remember Purple Heart Day, may we focus on the 1.7 million combat-wounded recipients and the sacrifices that they have made for our nation and our freedom.


Forget military aggression. Russia just made it illegal to talk about Jesus outside of a church!

Russia recently passed a set of anti-terrorism laws known as the Yarovaya package, which places broad limitations on missionary work, including preaching, teaching, and any activity designed to recruit people into a religious group. When it became a public law on July 20, it rolled back 19 years of religious freedom.

While Christians have enjoyed great freedom since the Iron Curtain collapsed, these laws are Russia’s most restrictive measures in post-Soviet history. The new laws contain several heavy restrictions on missionary activity and evangelism. The changes include laws against sharing your faith in homes, online, in writing, or any public space except a recognized church building.

As it now stands, Yarovaya requires missionaries to have permits, makes house churches illegal, and limits religious activity to the premises of registered church buildings. The rules are so tight that Christians in Russia cannot email their friends an invitation to church under the new surveillance and anti-terrorism laws. Anyone who disobeys could be fined up to $780 and organizations could be fined more than $15,000. Foreign visitors who violate the law can be detained and ultimately face deportation.

Russia’s Baptist Council of Churches wrote an open letter calling Yarovaya, “the most draconian anti-religion bill to be proposed in Russia since Nikita Khrushchev promised to eliminate Christianity in the Soviet Union.”

As fellow believers, we should all be appalled and upset with the Yarovaya laws. When religious freedom is swept away with the stroke of a pen, it affects the entire church. Now is the time for Christians across the globe to seek the Lord and pray that God will intercede for our brothers and sisters in Russia. Ask that God will unite Russian Christians and that this time of trial can be used to strengthen and grow the church.



prayer invite

A Kansas City, Kansas police officer was shot and killed on Tuesday. Police Captain Robert Melton was 46 years old. He gave 17 years of service to the Kansas City Police Department. He also was a veteran of the Kansas Army National Guard, who served in Afghanistan.

He was a dedicated servant who deeply cared for others. He understood the meaning of sacrifice and service. He lived out a calling to help people in distress even if it put his own life in peril.

Pray for his family and friends, the KC police department, and the Army community. Ask that God would comfort the friends and family of Captain Melton and strengthen them for the days ahead.



Today America celebrates 240 years of independence. As many are inclined to celebrate with fireworks, picnics, and parades, the Forth of July also provides the perfect opportunity to look back on the document and the ideas that brought us to this place in time.

When one looks at the Declaration of Independence the emphasis is clearly on reasons to separate from England.  It also articulates the fundamental ideas that form our nation:  all men are created free and equal and possess the same inherent, natural rights. These rights are not imagined, decreed, or penned on paper by mankind, but found in the eternal “Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God.” When rights are viewed and expressed as “God-given” the Declaration’s meaning transcends the particulars of time and circumstance.  It means that these rights are inherently possessed by all men because of the Almighty.

There are five references to God in the Declaration of Independence, two in the first paragraph, one in the middle, and two in the last paragraph.

As we continue our Fourth of July celebrations, may we take time to appreciate the idea that we are free people, but ultimately that our American freedom was born of God.

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