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Posts Tagged ‘combined federal campaign’

Americans gave almost $300 billion to charities in 2011.  That is a staggering number when you consider our troubled economy.  As a nation with high unemployment and frozen salaries for those who can find work, $300 billion is quite a hefty sum.  But that figure also represents an incredible feat of generosity.  One that deserves a deeper look.

When you dig into the total by category, you find that religious organizations received the most donations.  Religious organizations garnered nearly one-third of the total.

Generous giving of that magnitude creates a lot of attention in the news.  The talking heads and pundits on most media outlets are still discussing the story, but they don’t know how to interpret the information.  They point to foundations, museums, art and cultural groups, or research hospitals as worthy causes for such giving, but for some reason religious groups seem like an odd place for people to send that level of financial support.  In the end of their stories they end up scratching their heads as they try to figure out why people give and sacrifice in this manner.  To me, the answer is quite clear.  Churches, charities, missions, and religious organizations are performing the work of Christ.

Religious organizations feed the hungry, care for the sick, give comfort to the wounded, share hope with the broken-hearted, and minister to our souls.  Significant acts like these will always mean more to people than receiving a tax deduction.  It causes us to open our wallets.  It enables us to volunteer and assist others in their time of need.  It allows us to reflect Christ in a dark world.

As we approach Thanksgiving and Christmas, remember religious organizations, charities, and churches.  You can give through the combined federal campaign in the armed forces or locally.  Your financial support, no matter how great or small, allows people to share the redemptive story of Jesus and perform the loving work of our gracious God.

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