Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘navy’

2015AFDPoster

President Harry S. Truman led the effort to establish a single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.

On August 31, 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force Days.

The single day celebration stemmed from the unification of the Armed Forces under the Department of Defense.

These warriors demonstrate incredible sacrifice, selfless service, and devotion each day.  Take the opportunity to pray for a member of our Armed Forces and his or her family.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

If you are looking for a cause that needs your prayer and support in 2013, look no further than the American Soldier.

Even though the surge ended this year, there are 68,000 service members who are still fighting in Afghanistan.  While the headlines talk about budget cuts, college football games, and Hollywood celebrities, their stories are often untold and forgotten.

These are America’s warriors who have left their homes and families to defend our nation.  These are the college students who cancelled classes when their nation called.  These are the fathers and mothers who missed a child’s first steps at home.  These are the veterans who have dodged bullets and bombs to stay alive.

Remember them in 2013.  Remember those who are fighting and sacrificing for you.  Remember military spouses.  Remember military families.  Remember them in your prayers and your efforts.    Remember the 68,000.

Read Full Post »

There is no doubt who has the most difficult job when a service member is deployed.  Military spouses win that one hands down!  They do the job of two people, wrangle kids, make sure that the household stays afloat, and everything else while their warrior is downrange.

Military spouses have a new way to find resources online.  Spouselink is made for the needs and interests of the military spouse.  It covers a wide variety of topics and has a splash of pop culture included.  So take it for a test drive, watch a video, read an article, or share information with another family member with the click of a button.

http://www.spouselink.org

 

Read Full Post »

A sailor and an airman were among those killed in a theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., early Friday, family members and military officials confirmed Saturday.

The parents of Cryptologic Technician 3rd Class John Larimer, 27, released a statement that Navy officials notified them about midnight that their son was one of those killed. Navy officials also confirmed his death on Saturday. The family said Larimer’s brother Noel is working with the Navy to bring his body home to Crystal Lake, Ill.

Larimer joined the Navy in June 2011 and had been stationed in Aurora since October 2011, the Navy said.

Air Force Staff Sgt. Jesse Childress, 29, a reservist and cyber systems operator, also died in the attack, DoD officials said. Childress, who was single and had no children, joined the service in January 2002, DoD said.

Both were assigned to units based at Buckley Air Force Base, Colo.

In addition, an airmen and a sailor were among the 59 injured in the shooting at the Century 16 theater complex, about five miles from Buckley, shortly after midnight Friday. The injured sailor was treated at the scene and released; the nature of the sailor’s injuries is unknown. Three other sailors escaped unharmed.

All five sailors were attached to Navy Information Operations Command, Colorado. That command falls under the Navy’s cyber command and the U.S. 10th Fleet.

“The Navy and the Air Force are working with the families of these service members to ensure they have the care and attention they need,” read the statement, released Friday.

“This tragic event has affected everybody here at Buckley Air Force Base and our local community friends and neighbors,” base commander Col. Daniel Dant said in a statement. “We are deeply saddened by the loss of each and every loved one. All military or their families affected can receive assistance through our base services. Please contact the base chapel 720-847-4631 if you or a loved one need assistance due to this event.”

James Holmes, 24, has been named in media reports as the man in custody in connection with the mass shooting, which occurred at a premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora.

The Pentagon’s statement said Holmes never served in any branch of the military.

In addition to those killed, 59 people were wounded after the gunman set off a gas canister and started shooting about 30 minutes into the film.

By Jeff Schogol and Mark D. Faram – Staff writers
Posted : Saturday Jul 21, 2012 12:00:50 EDT

– – – – – – – – – – – –

Please pray for the military and civilian families who lost loved ones during this tragic event.

Read Full Post »

Found a great article on the struggles of marriage that will speak to every military couple.  She does a great job of sharing practical tips and reinforces the fact that being a Christian does not exempt you from marital problems.

Hats off to Elisabeth K. Corcoran for the excellent advice.  Enjoy the article.

In a Difficult Marriage? | Kyria.

Read Full Post »

Chaplains are pretty busy during Annual Training season in the National Guard.  Tuesday I gave another suicide prevention class.  It’s a requirement that Soldiers get the presentation at least once a year.  The training focuses on the magnitude of the problem, how common issues can drive anyone to the point of despair, and that everyone can watch out for your battle buddy.

While many try to pin the Army suicide issue on multiple deployments, the majority of issues that drive people to suicide are common issues:  failed relationships, financial difficulty, and legal woes.  These are typical factors that we see in the civilian population, at schools, in factories, and even in the church.  PTSD is a factor in military suicide, but it is not the top issue that Time magazine or other media outlets want you to believe.

The fundamental issue to remember is that everyone can save a life.  You probably survived a breakup, be it in high school, college, or at work.  You probably understand what it is like to bounce a check or have a tough time making your paycheck last the entire month.  We are all in the same boat.  We all have the life experience necessary to help people at risk of suicide.

Remember and apply ACE: Ask, Care, Escort.

If you believe that someone is at risk of suicide, ask him/her about the problem.  Find out what is going on in the person’s life.  Directly ask if he/she is thinking about suicide.  Care by listening to the issue.  Find out what is causing the pain and suffering.  Why is the Soldier upset?  Finally, escort the Soldier to a resource.  That can be a chaplain, a medic, a counselor, an NCO, a friend, or a family member.

Don’t leave the person alone.  Make sure that he or she gets help.  It is okay to call a suicide hotline or wake up a supervisor, just don’t ignore the warning signs.

You don’t have to be a mental health counselor to apply ACE.  You don’t have to be an expert.  But you can practice these basic steps in suicide first aid.  Do your part to reduce suicide and help your friends.

If you need immediate assistance these suicide hot lines are always available:

Military One Source – 1.877.995.5247 or National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 1.800.273.TALK (8255).

 

Read Full Post »

There is new interest in trying to prop up the Stolen Valor Act, a federal statute that prohibits people from lying about military service and being awarded military medals.

Last week the Supreme Court struck down the law on grounds that it violated free speech on a 6-3 ruling.  Many were disappointed with the action.  Veterans and military groups across the nation spoke in favor of the law.  While honest and integrity are at the heart of the law, people forget the impact this ruling will have on our service members.  As veterans continue to return home and seek jobs, there is an increasing need to separate fact from fiction.  Many private firms, along with government agencies, have veteran hiring preferences.  Those with military service may be placed ahead of others when applying for a job.  So there is something to gain from lying on a resume or job application.

Lawmakers will likely take a second bite at the apple.  Efforts are underway to pass another version of the law, one more narrowly focused.  The Stolen Valor Act 2.0, will make it illegal to lie about military service for profit.  This way charlatans cannot benefit from claiming military medals or combat tours.  By changing direction and focusing on the issue of fraud, let’s hope that this version will make constitutional muster.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: